Todos los Putos Días

Elegir un libro, y que encima nos guste, no deja de ser un riesgo “asumido” por el lector.  ¿Qué es lo primero que nos atrae de un libro? ¿La portada, la sinopsis, una recomendación…? Sea lo que sea, las grandes editoriales, pese a su  gran maquinaria de marketing, no  pueden garantizan la calidad de un …

Taxi, de Carlos Zanón, una novela de película

Carlos Zanón, como es habitual, sabe cómo acariciar las llagas ocultas de sus personajes con el único fin de despertar sus miedos para que vomiten la vida al ritmo de un arrastrado tango.

In Black and White

My last look at Jun’ichirō Tanizaki’s work involved a short piece blending thriller and erotic themes, and today’s choice, on the surface at least, is a very similar novel. Once again, we’re off to Tokyo, in the company of a writer who becomes swept up in an intrigue involving a beautiful woman and night-time assignations. […]…

The Lumber Room

The young have aspirations that never come to pass, the old have reminiscences of what never
happened.
H.H. Munro (SAKI)

Monsieur Proust by Céleste Albaret – Wonderful

Originally posted on Book Around The Corner:
Monsieur Proust by Céleste Albaret (1973) – Remembrances collected by Georges Belmont. Céleste was a country girl from the Creuse department who married Odilon Albaret in 1913 and came to live in Paris. Her husband was a taxi driver, one of Marcel Proust’s preferred chauffeurs. This is how…

The Impostor by Javier Cercas

Originally posted on Winstonsdad's Blog:
? The Impostor by Javier Cercas Spanish Non-Fiction Original title – El Impostor Translator – Frank Wynne Source – review copy Well, a change from German lit month for a book from one of my favourite Spanish writers of recent years. Javier Cercas has featured on the blog three…

Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

Originally posted on Book Around The Corner:
Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell. (April 1938) French title: Hommage à la Catalogne. It is very difficult to write accurately about the Spanish war, because of the lack of non-propagandist documents. I warn everyone against my bias, and I warn everyone against my mistakes. Still, I have…

Woman at Point Zero by Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt) tr.Sherif Hetata #WITMonth

Originally posted on Word by Word:
Author Nawal El Saadawi Nawal El Saadawi is an internationally renowned feminist writer, activist, physician and psychiatrist. Born outside Cairo, Egypt in 1931, she has published nearly 50 plays, novels and short story collections, translated into over 40 languages worldwide. Many of her works are taught in universities around the…

Young Man with a Horn – Dorothy Baker (1938)

Originally posted on heavenali:
My third read for the 1938 club was Dorothy Baker’s first novel Young Man with a Horn. The novel catapulted Baker into the literary limelight – and for many years it remained her best known work having been made into a film starring Doris Day, Kirk Douglas and Lauren Bacall. I…

#Woolfalong: Virginia Woolf’s ‘Between The Acts’

Originally posted on Hard Book Habit:
When the #Woolfalong reading challenge hosted by Heavenali popped up on my radar I jumped at the chance to read or re-read a number of Virginia Woolf’s novels over the course of the year. Having only recently re-read both Mrs Dalloway and To The Lighthouse – the choices for January and…

Book review: The Syria Dilemma

Originally posted on Book of words:
The Syrian crisis is now into its sixth year with tens of thousands killed and millions displaced. It is without a doubt one of the biggest humanitarian tragedy in modern times but has only in the past year received considerably more international attention. Written in 2013, The Syria Dilemma…

Bartleby & Co. by Enrique Vila-Matas (tr. Jonathan Dunne)

Originally posted on JacquiWine's Journal:
Taking advantage of the extension of Spanish Lit Month into August, I turned to Bartleby & Co., a clever and engaging piece of metafiction from esteemed Spanish author Enrique Vila-Matas. First published in Spanish in 2000, with an English translation following in 2004, Bartleby & Co. is a celebration…

Talking About Jane Austen in Baghdad

Originally posted on BookerTalk:
It began with a question in an email. Bee Rowlatt, BBC World Service journalist in London, wanted insight on how women in Iraq felt about the recent elections and what was happening in their country. Over the course of the next few months, emails zipped between her and May Witwit, lecturer in English…

The Fortunes of the Rougons by Émile Zola

Originally posted on BookerTalk:
With The Fortunes of the Rougons, Émile Zola embarked on an ambitious project to write a comprehensive fictional history of the social, sexual and moral landscape of his era. By examining in minute detail the “natural and social history” of two branches of the same family, he intended to demonstrate his theory…

One Life – Kate Grenville

Originally posted on Savidge Reads:
I have often believed that some of the most interesting stories can come not from the rich and famous but from those people in our families past. I have the tale of my Great Great Aunt who after burying her husband returned to his grave sometime later to discover his…

My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante

Originally posted on A Little Blog of Books:
‘My Brilliant Friend’ is the first in the series of Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan Novels. Translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein, it tells the story of two young girls, Elena Greco and Raffaela “Lila” Cerullo, spanning their friendship over the years. The series opens with Elena, aged…

Jean Cocteau, a versatile man

Jean Cocteau (1889 -1963), French writer and filmmaker Man seeks to escape himself in myth, and does so by any means at his disposal. Drugs, alcohol, or lies. Unable to withdraw into himself, he disguises himself. Lies and inaccuracy give him a few moments of comfort. I believe in luck: how else can you explain…

MysteryPeople Q&A with Don Winslow

Don Winslow’s sequel to Power Of The Dog, The Cartel, is one of the most talked about books of the summer, as well as our June Pick of the Month. The Cartel reignites the feud between DEA agent Art Keller and Mexican drug trafficker Adan Barrera, taking us through the war on drugs in the new millennium.…

The Truth and Other Lies by Sascha Arango

Originally posted on 52 books or bust:
I was on a bit of a reading slump when I came to The Truth and Other Lies by German screenwriter Sascha Arango, and it fed my slump to the dogs. That means it was good. The story was crazy, but crazy good. Henry is a bestselling author who…

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

Originally posted on A Little Blog of Books:
I’ve had mixed views about Kazuo Ishiguro’s novels in the past. I was baffled by ‘Never Let Me Go’ but enjoyed it, I was even more baffled by ‘The Unconsoled‘ and enjoyed it much less. I liked ‘When We Were Orphans’ but thought it wasn’t quite as…